Atypical antipsychotic agents, specifically those with a high hyposerotonergic activity such as clozapine and clothiapine, have been associated with de novo obsessive–compulsive symptoms. We report the case of a 16-year-old adolescent male with severe mental impairment and disruptive behaviour who developed a compulsive head and body turning disorder on clothiapine. Such a symptom had to be distinguished from epileptic partial seizures; it promptly disappeared with the drug discontinuation.

Related Articles A Pilot Investigation of a Behavioral Weight Control Pr... Rehabilitation Psychology A Pilot Investigation of a Behavioral Weight Control Program with Mentally Retarded Adolescents and Adults Rehabilitation Psychology, Volume 29, Issue 3, Autumn 1984, Pages 177-182 Mary B. Harris, Steven R. Bloom Abstract This study examined the long-term as well as the short-term effects of a behavioral weight control program for mentally retarded adolescents and adults. In addition to weight loss, changes in knowledge of behavioral and nutritional principles, along with measures of aerobic fitness and body size, were assessed. Significant changes on all measures but arm girth were found at the end of the program for the 10 participants, but weight losses and most other changes were no longer significant 1 year later. Subjects who were withdrawn from the program by their group home managers showed significant weight gains over the year. Subjects' IQ scores were significantly correlated with posttest and follow-up weight losses, and those residing with parents rather than in group homes were nonsignificantly more likely to remain in the program and to lose weight. Suggestions for modifying behavioral weight control programs to increase the chances of long-term success are made. PDF (307 K) A behavioral exploration of dependent and independent m... Applied Research in Mental Retardation A behavioral exploration of dependent and independent mildly mentally retarded adolescents and their mothers Original Research Article Applied Research in Mental Retardation, Volume 3, Issue 2, 1982, Pages 141-150 Elizabeth Hunt, Philip Browning, Gary Nave Abstract A study was conducted on behavioral differences between dependent and independent mildly mentally retarded adolescents and their mothers. Twelve dependent and 12 independent adolescent-mother pairs separately engaged in a videotaped problem solving task. These videotapes were subjected to a behavioral coding system consisting of five domains, i.e., problem solving, positive verbal, negative verbal, positive nonverbal, and negative non-verbal. Differential profiles were not evident between the two groups for either adolescents or their mothers. However, there were notable differences between a more stringently defined subset of dependent and independent adolescents and between their mothers. The subset of independent adolescent were more verbal and active in problem-solving than the dependent adolescents; the dependent subset exhibited a greater rate of negative non-verbal behavior; and mothers of the independent subset presented more positive non-verbal behaviors than did the mothers of the dependent subset. PDF (526 K) Group home designs for initiating community-based treat... Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry Group home designs for initiating community-based treatment with mentally retarded adolescent offenders Original Research Article Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, Volume 14, Issue 2, June 1983, Pages 141-145 George C. Denkowski, Kathryn M. Denkowski Abstract Increasingly, mentally retarded adolescent offenders are being diverted into community-based residential treatment. Thus, many of these aggressive youths, who would previously have been institutionalized are now diverted into available group home settings. Implementing restrictive aspects of treatment regimens with this population frequently evokes intense escape/avoidance behaviors which cannot be controlled at those open sites. As a result, in traditional group homes these adolescents readily avoid therapy, run away recurrently, and thus pose serious risks to themselves and the community. The authors describe two secure group home designs which seem to promote consistent treatment of this difficult population, while protecting the local community. Preliminary evidence is presented indicating that these specially designed environments are essential adjuncts to the initial phase of treatment of mentally retarded adolescent offenders. PDF (399 K) The sufficient conditions for directed forgetting in no... Intelligence The sufficient conditions for directed forgetting in normal and educable mentally retarded adolescents Original Research Article Intelligence, Volume 2, Issue 2, April-June 1978, Pages 153-167 Norman W. Bray, Elaine M. Justice, Deborah L. Simon Abstract A series of studies investigated the conditions under which normal and educable mentally retarded adolescents (13 to 15 years old) would or would not disregard irrelevant information in memory. A directed forgetting task was used in which the person was required to recall short sequences of picture names. In some sequences there was a cue to forget the first few pictures (irrelevant information) and to remember only the subsequent pictures (relevant information). When normal adolescents were given no explanation of the forget cue, there was interference from the irrelevant information. A minimum explanation of the cue, however, was sufficient to eliminate interference for the normal adolescents. The same minimal explanation was not sufficient for mentally retarded adolescents. It was clear that irrelevant information in memory interfered with the performance of retarded adolescents given only a minimal explanation of the forget cue. These results are important since most naturalistic situations do not involve an elaborate explanation of the importance of disregarding irrelevant information previously stored in memory. PDF (810 K) Depression and learned helplessness in mentally retarde... Applied Research in Mental Retardation Depression and learned helplessness in mentally retarded and nonmentally retarded adolescents: An initial investigation Original Research Article Applied Research in Mental Retardation, Volume 6, Issue 3, 1985, Pages 295-306 William M. Reynolds, Kim L. Miller Abstract Depression and learned helplessness were examined in a sample of 26 educably mentally retarded (EMR) adolescents and a matched (on age, sex, and race) group of 26 nonmentally retarded adolescents. Depression and learned helplessness were assessed using the Reynolds Adolescent Depression Scale (RADS) and Mastery Orientation Inventory (MOI), respectively. Results indicated that EMR adolescents manifested significantly (p<.001) greater depressive symptomalogy than their nonmentally retarded peers. Sex differences were also found, with females demonstrating greater depression scores in both groups. Analysis of severity of symptom endorsement showed significant group differences on items reflecting somatic, self-evaluative, and behavioral components of depression, with mentally retarded subjects demonstrating higher scores. Mentally retarded adolescents were found to score higher (p < .001) on the learned helplessness measure than nonmentally retarded adolescents. Given the problematic nature of depression noted in large sample epidemiological studies of nonmentally retarded adolescents, the results of this investigation indicate that depression in EMR adolescents is an affective characteristic in need of further study. PDF (674 K) View more related articles

Unusual compulsive motor activity during treatment with clothiapine in a mentally retarded adolesent

GRITTI, Antonella
2004

Abstract

Related Articles A Pilot Investigation of a Behavioral Weight Control Pr... Rehabilitation Psychology A Pilot Investigation of a Behavioral Weight Control Program with Mentally Retarded Adolescents and Adults Rehabilitation Psychology, Volume 29, Issue 3, Autumn 1984, Pages 177-182 Mary B. Harris, Steven R. Bloom Abstract This study examined the long-term as well as the short-term effects of a behavioral weight control program for mentally retarded adolescents and adults. In addition to weight loss, changes in knowledge of behavioral and nutritional principles, along with measures of aerobic fitness and body size, were assessed. Significant changes on all measures but arm girth were found at the end of the program for the 10 participants, but weight losses and most other changes were no longer significant 1 year later. Subjects who were withdrawn from the program by their group home managers showed significant weight gains over the year. Subjects' IQ scores were significantly correlated with posttest and follow-up weight losses, and those residing with parents rather than in group homes were nonsignificantly more likely to remain in the program and to lose weight. Suggestions for modifying behavioral weight control programs to increase the chances of long-term success are made. PDF (307 K) A behavioral exploration of dependent and independent m... Applied Research in Mental Retardation A behavioral exploration of dependent and independent mildly mentally retarded adolescents and their mothers Original Research Article Applied Research in Mental Retardation, Volume 3, Issue 2, 1982, Pages 141-150 Elizabeth Hunt, Philip Browning, Gary Nave Abstract A study was conducted on behavioral differences between dependent and independent mildly mentally retarded adolescents and their mothers. Twelve dependent and 12 independent adolescent-mother pairs separately engaged in a videotaped problem solving task. These videotapes were subjected to a behavioral coding system consisting of five domains, i.e., problem solving, positive verbal, negative verbal, positive nonverbal, and negative non-verbal. Differential profiles were not evident between the two groups for either adolescents or their mothers. However, there were notable differences between a more stringently defined subset of dependent and independent adolescents and between their mothers. The subset of independent adolescent were more verbal and active in problem-solving than the dependent adolescents; the dependent subset exhibited a greater rate of negative non-verbal behavior; and mothers of the independent subset presented more positive non-verbal behaviors than did the mothers of the dependent subset. PDF (526 K) Group home designs for initiating community-based treat... Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry Group home designs for initiating community-based treatment with mentally retarded adolescent offenders Original Research Article Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, Volume 14, Issue 2, June 1983, Pages 141-145 George C. Denkowski, Kathryn M. Denkowski Abstract Increasingly, mentally retarded adolescent offenders are being diverted into community-based residential treatment. Thus, many of these aggressive youths, who would previously have been institutionalized are now diverted into available group home settings. Implementing restrictive aspects of treatment regimens with this population frequently evokes intense escape/avoidance behaviors which cannot be controlled at those open sites. As a result, in traditional group homes these adolescents readily avoid therapy, run away recurrently, and thus pose serious risks to themselves and the community. The authors describe two secure group home designs which seem to promote consistent treatment of this difficult population, while protecting the local community. Preliminary evidence is presented indicating that these specially designed environments are essential adjuncts to the initial phase of treatment of mentally retarded adolescent offenders. PDF (399 K) The sufficient conditions for directed forgetting in no... Intelligence The sufficient conditions for directed forgetting in normal and educable mentally retarded adolescents Original Research Article Intelligence, Volume 2, Issue 2, April-June 1978, Pages 153-167 Norman W. Bray, Elaine M. Justice, Deborah L. Simon Abstract A series of studies investigated the conditions under which normal and educable mentally retarded adolescents (13 to 15 years old) would or would not disregard irrelevant information in memory. A directed forgetting task was used in which the person was required to recall short sequences of picture names. In some sequences there was a cue to forget the first few pictures (irrelevant information) and to remember only the subsequent pictures (relevant information). When normal adolescents were given no explanation of the forget cue, there was interference from the irrelevant information. A minimum explanation of the cue, however, was sufficient to eliminate interference for the normal adolescents. The same minimal explanation was not sufficient for mentally retarded adolescents. It was clear that irrelevant information in memory interfered with the performance of retarded adolescents given only a minimal explanation of the forget cue. These results are important since most naturalistic situations do not involve an elaborate explanation of the importance of disregarding irrelevant information previously stored in memory. PDF (810 K) Depression and learned helplessness in mentally retarde... Applied Research in Mental Retardation Depression and learned helplessness in mentally retarded and nonmentally retarded adolescents: An initial investigation Original Research Article Applied Research in Mental Retardation, Volume 6, Issue 3, 1985, Pages 295-306 William M. Reynolds, Kim L. Miller Abstract Depression and learned helplessness were examined in a sample of 26 educably mentally retarded (EMR) adolescents and a matched (on age, sex, and race) group of 26 nonmentally retarded adolescents. Depression and learned helplessness were assessed using the Reynolds Adolescent Depression Scale (RADS) and Mastery Orientation Inventory (MOI), respectively. Results indicated that EMR adolescents manifested significantly (p<.001) greater depressive symptomalogy than their nonmentally retarded peers. Sex differences were also found, with females demonstrating greater depression scores in both groups. Analysis of severity of symptom endorsement showed significant group differences on items reflecting somatic, self-evaluative, and behavioral components of depression, with mentally retarded subjects demonstrating higher scores. Mentally retarded adolescents were found to score higher (p < .001) on the learned helplessness measure than nonmentally retarded adolescents. Given the problematic nature of depression noted in large sample epidemiological studies of nonmentally retarded adolescents, the results of this investigation indicate that depression in EMR adolescents is an affective characteristic in need of further study. PDF (674 K) View more related articles
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12570/1411
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 0
social impact