: Humans are unique in the way they understand the causal relationships between the use of tools and achieving a goal. The idea at the core of the present research is that tool use can be considered as an instance of problem-solving situations supported by technical reasoning. In an eye-tracking study, we investigated the fixation patterns of participants (N = 32) looking at 3D images of thematically consistent (e.g., nail-steel hammer) and thematically inconsistent (e.g., scarf-steel hammer) object-tool pairs that could be either "hazardous" (accidentally electrified) or not. Results showed that under thematically consistent conditions, participants focused on the tool's manipulation area (e.g., the handle of a steel hammer). However, when electrified tools were present or when the visual scene was not action-prompting, regardless of the presence of electricity, the tools' functional/identity areas (e.g., the head of a steel hammer) were fixated longer than the tools' manipulation areas. These results support an integrated and reasoning-based approach to human tool use and document, for the first time, the crucial role of mechanical/semantic knowledge in tool visual exploration.

Humans are unique in the way they understand the causal relationships between the use of tools and achieving a goal. The idea at the core of the present research is that tool use can be considered as an instance of problem-solving situations supported by technical reasoning. In an eye-tracking study, we investigated the fixation patterns of participants (N = 32) looking at 3D images of thematically consistent (e.g., nail–steel hammer) and thematically inconsistent (e.g., scarf–steel hammer) object-tool pairs that could be either “hazardous” (accidentally electrified) or not. Results showed that under thematically consistent conditions, participants focused on the tool’s manipulation area (e.g., the handle of a steel hammer). However, when electrified tools were present or when the visual scene was not action-prompting, regardless of the presence of electricity, the tools’ functional/identity areas (e.g., the head of a steel hammer) were fixated longer than the tools’ manipulation areas. These results support an integrated and reasoning-based approach to human tool use and document, for the first time, the crucial role of mechanical/semantic knowledge in tool visual exploration.

Hazardous tools: the emergence of reasoning in human tool use

Federico, Giovanni
;
Brandimonte, Maria A.
2021

Abstract

: Humans are unique in the way they understand the causal relationships between the use of tools and achieving a goal. The idea at the core of the present research is that tool use can be considered as an instance of problem-solving situations supported by technical reasoning. In an eye-tracking study, we investigated the fixation patterns of participants (N = 32) looking at 3D images of thematically consistent (e.g., nail-steel hammer) and thematically inconsistent (e.g., scarf-steel hammer) object-tool pairs that could be either "hazardous" (accidentally electrified) or not. Results showed that under thematically consistent conditions, participants focused on the tool's manipulation area (e.g., the handle of a steel hammer). However, when electrified tools were present or when the visual scene was not action-prompting, regardless of the presence of electricity, the tools' functional/identity areas (e.g., the head of a steel hammer) were fixated longer than the tools' manipulation areas. These results support an integrated and reasoning-based approach to human tool use and document, for the first time, the crucial role of mechanical/semantic knowledge in tool visual exploration.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12570/19631
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